There are writers who manipulate the plot to suit their ideas of what a nice scene would be, and yet, it doesn’t logically follow the plot. Usually this involves a clichéd love scene.

An example of manipulating the plot to fit a scene would be: Your hero and heroine are in the middle of nowhere when caught in a torrential downpour, they find shelter in a ramshackle cabin, sans furniture. It’s cold, the H/H are soaked to the skin, wind is whistling through walnut-sized cracks, but–despite their chattering teeth, and the blue tinge to their anatomy–the hero and heroine have wild, passionate sex.

What’s wrong with this scenario? Events have to follow logic. Unless you’ve laid the groundwork to establish your hero as a superhuman sex machine, sub-zero temperatures are the opposite of a turn on. In fact, the hero may suffer from a chronic case of ‘shrinkage,’ if you catch my drift. Other turn-offs are sand, insects, reptiles, or rodents scurrying about, and scenes where the H/H haven’t bathed or eaten in days, but the minute they are alone and supposedly ‘safe,’ they have sex.

Ask yourself how often you have manipulated the plot to fit the scene.

Happy Writing!

Loretta

Loretta C. Rogers
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Loretta C. Rogers

Founding President at SSRA
Loretta C. Rogers, is a national/international best-selling author of fifteen novels. She conducts writing workshops nationally, and is a co-founder and past president of Sunshine State Romance Authors, Inc. and a member of Romance Writers of America®. A fourth generation Floridian, Loretta resides in Citrus County. She enjoys hearing from readers and invites them to visit her at LorettaCRogersBooks.com
Loretta C. Rogers
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